Friday, December 31, 2010

Your New Years Eve Mental Sorbet: Barney Miller

Here is your New Years Eve "Mental Sorbet".

Barney Miller: Season 2, Episode 15
On New Year's Eve Fish tries to stop a jumper, and Wojo delivers a baby.







Stay Tuned &

Happy New Year



Tony & Donna Figueroa

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

TV Confidential Archives Dec. 20, 2010

First hour: A look at Larry King's final broadcast on CNN; the 80 Greatest Moments in Television, according to the Hollywood Reporter; the Top Ten TV Episodes of 2010, according to Movieline; tributes to Blake Edwards and Alan Armer; and more holiday DVD recommendations. Also in this hour: Tony Figueroa remembers the premieres of How The Grinch Stole Christmas, the birth of director James Burrows, the death of Dean Martin and other events that happened This Week in TV History.

Second hour: Ed welcomes actor, author, producer and television historian Herbie J Pilato, founder of The Classic TV Preservation Society and author of The Bionic Book: The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman Reconstructed and other books on classic TV series, and a consultant on The Six Million Dollar Man Complete Series DVD Set recently released by Time-Life. Topics include the origins of the Bionic shows, their impact on television in the 1970s and their continued appeal today. Plus: Herbie's Top Ten TV Christmas Specials, Top Ten TV Animated Specials and Top Ten Christmas Songs.

Monday, December 27, 2010

This week in Television History: December 2010 PART IV

Listen to me on TV CONFIDENTIAL with Ed Robertson and Frankie Montiforte Broadcast LIVE every other Monday at 9pm ET, 6pm PT (immediately following STU'S SHOW) on Shokus Internet Radio. The program will then be repeated Tuesday thru Sunday at the same time (9pm ET, 6pm PT)on Shokus Radio for the next two weeks, and then will be posted on line at our archives page at TVConfidential.net. We are also on Share-a-Vision Radio (KSAV.org) Friday at 7pm PT and ET, either before or after the DUSTY RECORDS show, depending on where you live.

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history, the more that fact and legend become intertwined. It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

December 30, 1940
TV director James Burrows born in Los Angeles.

Raised in New York City, Burrows graduated from Oberlin College and received a master’s degree in theater from Yale University. During the 1970s, he directed episodes of such popular sitcoms as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Bob Newhart Show and Laverne & Shirley. From 1978 to 1982, Burrows was the principal director of Taxi, a sitcom about New York City cab drivers featuring an ensemble cast that included Judd Hirsch, Danny DeVito, Tony Danza, Marilu Henner, Jeff Conaway, Andy Kaufman and Christopher Lloyd. Burrows and the former Taxi writers Glen Charles and Les Charles went on to develop a show called Cheers, which centers around a group of employees and regular patrons at a Boston-based watering hole. Cheers, which premiered on September 30, 1982, on NBC, starred Ted Danson as Sam Malone, a former professional baseball player and ladies man who runs the bar. The Cheers cast also included Woody Harrelson, John Ratzenberger, George Wendt, Rhea Perlman, Kirstie Alley and Kelsey Grammer (as snooty psychiatrist Frasier Crane). Though Cheers was almost cancelled due to poor first-season ratings, it eventually became a massive hit with audiences and was nominated for more than 100 Emmy Awards, winning 28. The final episode of Cheers, which aired on May 20, 1993, attracted over 80 million viewers, making it one of the top-rated finales in TV history.
Burrows went on to direct multiple episodes of the hit Cheers spinoff Frasier, which starred Kelsey Grammer and originally aired from 1993 to 2004. Burrows also lent his Midas touch to the long-running sitcom Friends by helming the pilot as well as more than a dozen other episodes. Friends, which originally aired from 1994 to 2004 and co-starred Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox Arquette, Lisa Kudrow, David Schwimmer, Matthew Perry and Matt LeBlanc, was another huge ratings success. During the 1990s, Burrows also directed pilots for such shows as Wings, Caroline in the City, NewsRadio, 3rd Rock from the Sun and Dharma & Greg.
In 1998, Burrows became an executive producer of Will & Grace and reportedly directed every episode of the sitcom, which originally aired through May 18, 2006. The show starred Debra Messing as Grace, an interior designer, and Eric McCormack as Grace’s best friend Will, a gay attorney. Sean Hayes played Will and Grace’s flamboyant friend Jack, while Megan Mullaly co-starred as Grace’s wealthy, pill-popping assistant Karen. The wildly popular Will & Grace was the first network sitcom to feature homosexual main characters. More recently, Burrows has directed such shows as the short-lived Back to You (2007-2008) with Kelsey Grammer and Patricia Heaton.

December 30th 1971
Pete Duel was killed by a gunshot which the police determined to be self inflicted, either by accident or suicide.


In the early hours of December 31, 1971, Duel apparently shot himself, after drinking heavily that evening. At the time, his girlfriend, Dianne Ray, was in the house but not in the same room, and did not witness what happened. In October 1970 he had been the driver in a car wreck in which another person was injured, and was facing legal problems; an astrologer had then told him that 1972 was going to be a difficult year for him. After his death, his role in Alias Smith and Jones was taken over by Roger Davis (previously, the series' narrator), but the sudden loss proved too great and fans were slow to accept the dissimilar-looking Davis. The series was cancelled in 1973.
A memorial service was held on January 2nd 1972 at the Self Realization Fellowship Shrine, a place suggested by his friend and manager, John Napier. His family and many of his friends were there, though Ben Murphy was too upsetto attend. Pete Duel was buried, after a private service, in his hometown of Penfield, New York.
Why and exactly how the fatal shooting occurred, no one can say. The press have speculated in dozens of articles. None of that speculation can ease the loss of the talented young man.

December 30, 1985
Rick Nelson is killed in a plane crash.

Nelson got his start by starring in his parents' TV series, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.
Nelson was born in 1940 to famous parents: His father, Ozzie Nelson, was a bandleader, and his mother, Harriet, was a singer and actress. When Ricky was four years old, his parents launched their radio series, playing themselves, with actors playing their young sons. Five years later, Ricky and his older brother, David, suggested that they, like their parents, play themselves on the series. In 1952, the series moved to TV.
Nelson attended Hollywood High School and showed little interest in music until his girlfriend raved to him about Elvis. He boasted that he was about to cut a record himself. His father let him cut a demo with his orchestra; Nelson claimed he chose to cover Fats Domino's "I'm Walkin'" because it relied heavily on the two guitar chords Nelson knew how to play.
When Nelson played the song on the TV series, he became an overnight sensation. His first album, released in November 1957, topped the Billboard charts, and Nelson became one of the best-selling male singers of the 1950s, with 53 Hot 100 hits, 17 in the Top 10. Nelson later changed his name from Ricky to Rick. He also appeared in several movies, including Rio Bravo with John Wayne and Dean Martin in 1959 and The Wackiest Ship in the Army in 1960.
After Ozzie and Harriet went off the air in 1966, Nelson's music career fizzled until he discovered the emerging style of country rock. On two albums, he covered country material and scored a few hits in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Although he would never be a superstar again, he continued touring aggressively, performing more than 200 nights a year. He put together a new band in 1985 and signed a new record deal, but on December 31, en route to a concert in Texas, he died in a plane crash at age 45. The last song he performed live was a cover of "Rave On" by Buddy Holly, who also died in a plane crash.

January 1, 1943
Don Novello writer,
film director, producer, actor, singer, and comedian is born.

Novello is best known for his work on NBC's Saturday Night Live, from 1977 until 1980, and then 1985 until 1986, often as the character "Father Guido Sarducci". Novello has appeared as "Sarducci" on many television shows since then, including Married... with Children, Blossom, It's Garry Shandling's Show, Unhappily Ever After and Square Pegs.

January 2, 1990
Alan Hale Jr., the Skipper on Gilligan's Island, dies of cancer at age 68.

Hale was born in Los Angeles, California. His father was character actor Alan Hale, Sr. and his mother was Gretchen Hartman (1897–1979), a silent film actress. His father (whom his son greatly resembled), had an extremely successful career in movies both as a leading man in silent films and as a supporting actor in sound movies, appearing in many Errol Flynn films, acting in 235 movies altogether, and playing Little John in Robin Hood films three times over a 28-year span, beginning with the silent Douglas Fairbanks version. While his father was adapting to sound films, Hale, Jr. began his career while still a baby.
During the Second World War, Hale, Jr. enlisted in the United States Coast Guard.
After the death of his father in 1950, Alan stopped using "Junior".
Hale's first important roles were as a member of Gene Autry's recurring cast of players. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, he frequently appeared in Autry movies and The Gene Autry Show on TV. He also starred in television series, such as 1952–53's Biff Baker U.S.A.. He guest starred in the NBC western anthology Frontier. He later appeared in the classic syndicated western series Wanted Dead or Alive opposite Steve McQueen in episode No. 5 as Shawnee Bill, and played the titular lead in the television series Casey Jones (32 black and white episodes of 25 minutes from 1957 to 1958). In 1961, he appeared in Audie Murphy's short-lived NBC western detective series, Whispering Smith, as the witness to a murder. In 1962, Hale also appeared on The Andy Griffith Show as Jeff Pruitt, a rough, back-woods bachelor who comes to Mayberry to find a bride. In the episode, he refers to Barney Fife more than once as "little buddy," a nickname he would later use in his most famous and beloved role, that of the Skipper on Gilligan's Island, which ran from 1964 to 1967. He appeared in an episode of CBS's The New Phil Silvers Show in the 1963–1964 season.
Hale's work was not confined to comedies. In 1958, he guest starred on NBC's adventure series Northwest Passage, co-starring Buddy Ebsen. In 1962, he guest starred in an episode of ABC's crime drama Target: The Corruptors! with Stephen McNally. He starred with Bob Denver (Hale's Gilligan co-star) in The Good Guys (1968–70). He appeared in three episodes of ABC's Fantasy Island in the late 1970s and early 1980s.
During his career, he was noted for his supporting character roles in such movies as Up Periscope with James Garner, The Fifth Musketeer, The Lady Takes a Flyer, stock car racing film Thunder in Carolina, The Giant Spider Invasion, Hang 'Em High with Clint Eastwood, and The West Point Story with James Cagney as well as The Gunfighter with Gregory Peck.
The Skipper on Gilligan's Island (1964–1967) proved to be the most prominent role for Hale, as the show continued to be popular for later generations of viewers due to syndicated re-runs. The popularity of the show typecast its actors, making it difficult for them to successfully pursue diversified acting opportunities. They received no substantial residual payments for their roles, and the difficulty in finding roles often created financial hardship and resentment. However, Hale often said he did not mind being so closely identified with the Skipper. He co-owned a restaurant in the West Hollywood area (Alan Hale's Lobster Barrel) and would often greet customers in his "Skipper" hat.
During the weekends of 1974 to 1977, a new generation enjoyed the cartoon version of The New Adventures of Gilligan and by 1978, they brought back the original crew for a TV movie named Rescue From Gilligan's Island. Hale also portrayed the Skipper in two more TV reunion movies in 1979 and 1981, and participated in numerous reunions with the cast throughout the 1980s. His final appearances as the Skipper were on a 1988 episode of the sitcom ALF, and for several 1989 clips promoting Gilligan's Island reruns on TBS (TV network), both alongside his old friend Bob Denver. He also made a cameo appearance with Denver in the film Back to the Beach.
Hale was known for his great love of children. When he was dying of cancer, he learned there was a sick child in the same hospital who loved the Gilligan's Island show. He went to see the boy and said "The Skipper's here, son, everything is going to be all right." The child, having noticed all the weight Hale had lost due to cancer, inquired about it. Hale made up a story on the spot about how there was a new version of the show in the works, and he was going to play Gilligan.
A resident of Hollywood, California in the final years, Hale died of thyroid cancer at St. Vincent's Medical Center in Los Angeles January 2, 1990 (aged 68). He was cremated, and his ashes were scattered at sea.

To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Saturday, December 25, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: It's a Wonderful Life *HD*

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.



Saturday Night Live: Season 12 - Episode 8
Think you know this classic? Think again.


Stay Tuned & Merry Christmas


Tony Figueroa

Friday, December 24, 2010

Happy Holidays from Your Friends at TV CONFIDENTIAL

Join us as we look back at 2010: The Year in Television on the next edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL, premiering Monday, Dec. 27 at 9pm ET, 6pm PT on Shokus Internet Radio, with encore presentations Tuesday, Dec. 28 at 11:05pm ET, 8:05pm on Passionate World Radio, Friday, Dec. 31 at 7pm ET and PT on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org, plus three times a day on ShokusRadio.com through Sunday, Jan. 2.

We’ll talk about some of the major stories that dominated the world of television over the past year, from the NBC Late Night Debacle to Conan’s Legally Prohibited From Being Funny on Television Tour, to the series finales of Lost and Law and Order to the departure of Jeff Zucker, from the rise of the so-called Alpha Boomer demographic to Bristol Palin, Dancing with the Stars and everything in between. Plus: a look at what’s on the cable TV horizon in 2011 and This Week in TV History.

In the meantime, Happy Holidays to you and your and all good wishes for the New Year and beyond.



TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Tuesdays 11:05pm, 8:05pm PT
Passionate World Radio
Fridays 7pm ET and PT
Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
Three times a day, every day
on
Shokus Internet Radio
www.tvconfidential.net
blog.tvconfidential.net
Also available as a podcast via
iTunes and FeedBurner
Find us now on
Facebook

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: A Charlie Brown Christmas

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

The first prime-time animated TV special based upon the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. It was produced and directed by former Warner Bros. and UPA animator Bill Meléndez. The special aired on CBS from its debut in 1965 through 2000, and has aired on ABC since 2001. For many years it aired only annually, but is now telecast at least twice during the Christmas season. The special has been honored with both an Emmy and Peabody Award.

A Charlie Brown Christmas

Abominable "Bommi" Snowman MySpace Video

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

This is the classic stop-motion animation Christmas special. Featuring Rudolph, an Elf who wants to be a dentist, the isle of misfits and an Abominable Snowman.


Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Abominable "Bommi" Snowman Myspace Video


Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: 'How The Grinch Stole Christmas'

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Chuck Jones adapted the story as an animated special in 1966, featuring narration by Boris Karloff, and songs sung (uncredited) by Thurl Ravenscroft. The animated film often appears on American television during the Christmas season.

How The Grinch Stole Christmas

Sneetches MySpace Video


Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Steve Landesberg

In the days when I could not watch Johnny Carson on a School night and before we had HBO I saw a lot of comedians on day time talk shows. Here was one of the best.

Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense.
Steve Landesberg




Good night Mr. Landesberg

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Frosty the Snowman

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Rankin/Bass animated classic featuring the singing of Jimmy Durante.


Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Monday, December 20, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Mickey's Christmas Carol

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
The Disney version of Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol'.

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

This week in Television History: December 2010 PART III

Listen to me on TV CONFIDENTIAL with Ed Robertson and Frankie Montiforte Broadcast LIVE every other Monday at 9pm ET, 6pm PT (immediately following STU'S SHOW) on Shokus Internet Radio. The program will then be repeated Tuesday thru Sunday at the same time (9pm ET, 6pm PT)on Shokus Radio for the next two weeks, and then will be posted on line at our archives page at TVConfidential.net. We are also on Share-a-Vision Radio (KSAV.org) Friday at 7pm PT and ET, either before or after the DUSTY RECORDS show, depending on where you live.

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history, the more that fact and legend become intertwined. It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

December 23, 1966
How The Grinch Stole Christmas priemered.

The classic Dr. Seuss Christmas story combined with the animation of Chuck Jones. Horror icon Boris Karloff supplies the voice of the Grinch, who plans on spitefully ruining Christmas for the town of Whoville by stealing all the presents. Watched regularly every holiday season and beloved by children and cynical adults alike, this animated gem is just that and more. The story is from the book by Dr. Seuss. Thurl Ravenscroft (of "Tony the Tiger" breakfast commercial fame) provides the memorable bass singing voice for the tune "You're a Mean One, Mister Grinch."

December 24, 1948
Perry Como Show debuts.

Perry Como launches his long-running TV variety show. At first, the show was simply a TV broadcast of Como's musical-variety radio program and lasted just 15 minutes. Gradually, though, the program grew into its new medium. The show grew to a half-hour, then a full hour in 1955. The show ran until 1963.
Como was born in 1912 in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. As a teenager, he worked as a barber but began touring with bands as a young man. By the 1940s, he was releasing a string of hit recordings, starting with "Long Ago and Far Away" in 1944. Between 1940 and 1955, he was second only to Bing Crosby in the number of hits released-including 42 Top 10 hits by 1958. Among his chart-toppers were "Prisoner of Love," "Surrender," and "Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba."

December 25, 1995
Actor and singer Dean Martin dies at the age of 78.

Martin was born Dino Paul Crocetti in Steubenville, Ohio, in 1917. After working as a prizefighter and a steelworker, Martin started a nightclub act. In 1946, he teamed up with comedian Jerry Lewis, and they became one of the most successful comedy duos of all time. A hit with live audiences and on television, Lewis and Martin made 16 movies together over 10 years, starting with My Friend Irma in 1949. After the duo split up, Martin launched his own TV variety show, which ran from 1965 to 1974. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Martin teamed up with Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford, and Joey Bishop to perform in Las Vegas. The group, known as the Rat Pack, made several movies together in the early 1960s, including Ocean's Eleven (1960), Sergeants Three (1962), and Robin and the Seven Hoods (1964).

To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Sunday, December 19, 2010

The Six Million Dollar Man Reconstructed: Next on TV CONFIDENTIAL

Go behind the scenes of The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman on the next edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL, premiering Monday, Dec. 20 at 9pm ET, 6pm PT on Shokus Internet Radio, with encore presentations Tuesday, Dec. 21 at 11:05pm ET, 8:05pm on Passionate World Radio, Friday, Dec. 24 at 7pm ET, 4pm PT on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org, plus three times a day on ShokusRadio.com through Sunday, Dec. 26.

Join us as we welcome actor, author, producer and television historian Herbie J Pilato, founder of The Classic TV Preservation Society and author of Bewitched Forever, The Kung Fu Book of Caine, The Bionic Book: The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman Reconstructed and other books on classic TV series. Herbie was also a consultant on The Six Million Dollar Man Complete Series DVD Set recently released by Time-Life, so we'll be talking about the origins of the Bionic shows, their impact on television in the 1970s, their continued appeal among audiences today, and a whole lot more. And since the holidays are upon us, Herbie has put together some fun holiday Top Ten lists that we think you'll enjoy, including the Top Ten TV Christmas Specials of All Time. All this when Herbie joins us in our second hour.

In our first hour, we'll pay tribute to Blake Edwards and Alan Armer, both of whom passed away earlier this month, as well continue our look at holiday DVD recommendations. Plus: This Week in TV History.

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Tuesdays 11:05pm, 8:05pm PT Passionate World Radio
Fridays 7pm ET and PT Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
Three times a day, every day on Shokus Internet Radio www.tvconfidential.net
blog.tvconfidential.net
Also available as a podcast via iTunes and FeedBurner
Find us now on Facebook

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Santa Claus is Comin' To Town

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
Another Rankin Bass classic. The Mailman decides to answer some of the most common questions about Santa Claus, and tells us about a small baby named Kris who was left on the doorstep of a family of toymakers - the Kringles.

Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Saturday, December 18, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Mythbusters: Christmas Special

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
On this special episode, Jamie and Adam present the winners from our fall 2004 favorite-myths online poll. So, did you guys vote for Stinky Car? Or will Pop Rocks and Coke emerge triumphant? Also, the MythBusters try their hand at a few holiday myths: Will putting a silver spoon in a champagne bottle keep it fizzy? Does a snowman melt faster with its clothes on ... or off?

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Friday, December 17, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Christmas Unwrapped

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
Christmas Unwrapped: The Truth About Christmas
British documentary that aired on the History Channel. Documents the pagan roots behind many of our modern Christmas traditions.

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Santa Claus Conquers the Martians

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
"The Martians kidnap Santa because there is nobody on Mars to give their children presents." One of the worst films ever made, however it can be very funny if you have enough sense of humour.

Stay Tuned
Tony Figueroa

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: The Star Wars Holiday Special

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

The infamous Star Wars Holiday Special from 1978. One of the worst holiday specials of all-time. Also features the first screen appearance of Boba Fett. Enjoy (if you can).

Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Alvin and the Chipmunks

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Alvin, Simon, and Theodore singing a christmas song



Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Monday, December 13, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Christmas Flintstone

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

The Flintstone Season 5 Christmas episode.




Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

This week in Television History: December 2010 PART II

Listen to me on TV CONFIDENTIAL with Ed Robertson and Frankie Montiforte Broadcast LIVE every other Monday at 9pm ET, 6pm PT (immediately following STU'S SHOW) on Shokus Internet Radio. The program will then be repeated Tuesday thru Sunday at the same time (9pm ET, 6pm PT)on Shokus Radio for the next two weeks, and then will be posted on line at our archives page at TVConfidential.net. We are also on Share-a-Vision Radio (KSAV.org) Friday at 7pm PT and ET, either before or after the DUSTY RECORDS show, depending on where you live.

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history, the more that fact and legend become intertwined. It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

December 13, 1925
Dick Van Dyke born in West Plains, Missouri.

Van Dyke, who was raised in Danville, Illinois, served in the military during World War II and in the 1950s took various acting jobs and hosted a series of TV game shows. In 1960, he starred on Broadway in Bye Bye Birdie, a role which earned him a Tony Award. The following year, he signed on to play comedy writer Rob Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show. The show was the brainchild of the writer-director-producer Carl Reiner, who reportedly based the sitcom on his own experiences working as a comedy writer for Sid Caesar. The Dick Van Dyke Show featured a strong ensemble cast that included Mary Tyler Moore as Rob’s wife Laura, Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie as Rob’s colleagues Buddy and Sally and Larry Matthews as the Petries’ son, Ritchie. In the show’s opening credits, Van Dyke was famously seen tripping over an ottoman in the family’s home in New Rochelle, New York, where, in keeping with the conservative broadcasting standards of the time, Rob and Laura Petrie slept in separate beds. After The Dick Van Dyke Show went off the air in 1966, Mary Tyler Moore starred in her own successful TV sitcom, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, which originally aired from 1970 to 1977.
In addition to his TV success in the 1960s, Van Dyke appeared in a string of movies, including the 1963 big-screen adaptation of Bye Bye Birdie, which co-starred Ann-Margret and Janet Leigh. The following year, he appeared as the charming chimney sweep Bert in Walt Disney’s movie musical Mary Poppins, which featured Julie Andrews, in her feature film debut, as the umbrella-toting super nanny. The film, now a beloved cinematic classic, earned 13 Academy Award nominations and took home five Oscars, including Best Actress for Andrews. Though Van Dyke received positive reviews for his singing and dancing, critics skewered him for his bad English accent. In 1968, Van Dyke had another hit movie musical with Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, in which he plays the eccentric inventor Caratacus Potts, who develops a magic car. The film’s screenplay was co-written by Roald Dahl, the best-selling author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
From 1971 to 1974, Van Dyke starred in The New Dick Van Dyke Show, playing a Phoenix TV talk show host. The actor, who in the 1970s went public with his struggle with alcoholism, was featured in a series of made-for-TV movies and did guest appearances on various TV shows before he was cast in another successful series, the medical crime drama Diagnosis Murder. The show, which originally aired from 1993 to 2001, also featured Van Dyke’s son Barry Van Dyke.
After half a century in show business, Van Dyke continues to act. Among his recent movie credits are Curious George (2006) and Night at the Museum (2007).

December 14, 1969
Frosty the Snowman first aired on
December 14, 1969 on CBS.

The show, based on thepopular song of the same title, was produced for television by Rankin/Bass and featured the voices of comedians Jimmy Durante as narrator and Jackie Vernon as the title character. This special marked the first use of traditional cel animation for Rankin/Bass. Arthur Rankin, Jr. and Jules Bass wanted to give the show and its characters the look of a Christmas card, so Paul Coker, Jr., a greeting card and MAD Magazine artist, was hired to do the character and background drawings. The actual animation work was done in Japan, by Osamu Tezuka's studio, Mushi Production. Rankin/Bass veteran writer Romeo Muller adapted and expanded the story for television as he had done with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in 1964.

December 14, 1999
1984 Howard Cosell retires from Monday Night Football.

In 1970, ABC executive producer for sports Roone Arledge hired Cosell to be a commentator for Monday Night Football, the first time in 15 years that American football was broadcast weekly in prime time. Cosell was accompanied most of the time by ex-football players Frank Gifford and "Dandy" Don Meredith.
Cosell was openly contemptuous of ex-athletes appointed to prominent sportscasting roles solely on account of their playing fame. He regularly clashed on-air with Meredith, whose laid-back style was in sharp contrast to Cosell's.
The Cosell-Meredith-Gifford dynamic helped make Monday Night Football a success; it frequently was the number one rated program in the Nielsen ratings. Cosell's inimitable style distinguished Monday Night Football from previous sports programming, and ushered in an era of more colorful broadcasters and 24/7 TV sports coverage.

To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Sunday, December 12, 2010

The Day John Lennon Died: Next on TV CONFIDENTIAL

Go back in time to New York City and the world that John Lennon woke up to on the last day of his life, on the next edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL, premiering Monday, Dec. 13 at 9pm ET, 6pm PT on Shokus Internet Radio, with encore presentations Tuesday, Dec. 14 at 11:05pm ET, 8:05pm on Passionate World Radio, Friday, Dec. 17 at 7pm ET and PT on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org, plus three times a day on ShokusRadio.com through Sunday, Dec. 19.

Join us as we welcome television producer and New York Times bestselling author Keith Elliot Greenberg, whose latest book, December 8, 1980: The Day John Lennon Died not only provides a minute-by-minute, almost documentary-like look at the last day of John Lennon's life, but is also a moving account of Lennon's life as a whole, his career with The Beatles, his relationship with Yoko Ono, and his impact on the world in general. Keith Elliot Greenberg will be joining us in our second hour. In our first hour, we'll remember Don Meredith, former NFL quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys and one of the original members, along with Howard Cosell, of the broadcast team for ABC's Monday Night Football. Our guest that hour will be author Wesley Hyatt, whose books on television include Kicking Off the Week: A History of Monday Night Football on ABC Television, 1970-2005. All this, plus more holiday DVD recommendations and This Week in TV History.

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Tuesdays 11:05pm, 8:05pm PT Passionate World Radio
Fridays 7pm ET and PT Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
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Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Peace On Earth

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Peace on Earth is a 1939 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer cartoon short subject directed by Hugh Harman, about a post-apocalyptic world populated by animals.



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Tony Figueroa

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: The Great Santa Claus Switch

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
The Great Santa Claus Switch was a Muppet television special that first aired on CBS on December 20, 1970.

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Tony Figueroa

Friday, December 10, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: The Alan Brady Show Presents

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

The Dick Van Dyke Show: Season 3 - Episode 13
The entire Alan Brady staff presents a Christmas show instead of the script turned in by the show's writers.

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Tony Figueroa

Thursday, December 09, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Family Ties: A Keaton Christmas Carol

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Dickens' A Christmas Carol inspires this episode featuring Alex as the Keaton Scrooge



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Tony Figueroa

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: The Beverly Hillbillies

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.
The Beverly Hillbillies: Episode 13 - Home For Christmas
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Tony Figueroa

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

TV Confidential Archives Nov. 29, 2010


First hour: Tony Figueroa takes a look at the careers of Jon Stewart and Richard Pryor as part of a special expanded edition of This Week in Television History. Also in this hour: the Top Ten Thanksgiving-Themed Television Episodes, according to GoldDerby.com, plus listener feedback on Nielsen's recent findings that Americans are currently watching nearly five hours of television a day.


Second hour: Ed welcomes writer, producer and novelist Richard Shapiro, co-creator of Dynasty, The Colbys and other TV series, and the writer/producer of such acclaimed miniseries and TV movies as East of Eden, Intimate Strangers, Minstrel Man, and Sarah T: Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic. Richard's new novel, Tobacco Brown, is an epic-length story about one man's search for meaning that is not only poignant and thought-provoking, but often hysterically funny.

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: Ozzie and Harriet

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

Christmas Episode from the Classic TV Show "Ozzie and Harriet"

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Tony Figueroa

Monday, December 06, 2010

Your HOLIDAY SOR-BAY: The Brady Bunch

Here is a "HOLIDAY SOR-BAY" that we could use to artificially stimulate our Christmas spirit.

The twelfth episode of the Brady Bunch


View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com
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Tony Figueroa

This week in Television History: December 2010 PART I

Listen to me on TV CONFIDENTIAL with Ed Robertson and Frankie Montiforte Broadcast LIVE every other Monday at 9pm ET, 6pm PT (immediately following STU'S SHOW) on Shokus Internet Radio. The program will then be repeated Tuesday thru Sunday at the same time (9pm ET, 6pm PT)on Shokus Radio for the next two weeks, and then will be posted on line at our archives page at TVConfidential.net. We are also on Share-a-Vision Radio (KSAV.org) Friday at 7pm PT and ET, either before or after the DUSTY RECORDS show, depending on where you live.

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history, the more that fact and legend become intertwined. It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

December 8, 1980
John Lennon, is murdered by a deranged fan in front of his New York apartment building.

Lennon was born in 1940 in Liverpool, England. As a boy, Lennon lived with his aunt after his father left the family. Lennon attended Quarry Bank High School, from which he derived the name for his first band, the Quarrymen, formed in 1955. In 1956, he met Paul McCartney, who joined the band, and the two began writing songs together. George Harrison joined the band in 1957, and the three played together under several different names and with varying members until 1960, when they adopted the name the Beatles.
The band toured German beerhouses in 1961 and debuted later that year at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, where they gave more than 300 performances during the next two years. Drummer Ringo Starr joined the group in 1962. The group scored several U.K. hits in 1963, launching the "Beatlemania" tidal wave that hit the United States in 1964. In a little more than 10 years, the group transformed rock and roll, scoring 20 No. 1 hits on the Billboard pop charts, more than any group in history. The group's records spent a total of 59 weeks topping the charts between 1964 and 1970.
Lennon divorced his first wife, Cynthia Lennon, the mother of his son Julian, and married artist Yoko Ono in 1969. With Ono, he released the album Two Virgins in 1968. He became more involved in liberal political causes and pursued projects with Ono. In 1970, McCartney announced that the Beatles had broken up. Lennon released his first solo album, Imagine, in 1971, and it rose to No. 1 on the charts. During the next few years, he released projects with Ono as well as his own solo albums, including chart-topper Walls and Bridges (1974). He gave his last public performance in 1974 and released his last solo album, Rock 'n' Roll, the following year. In 1975, Lennon and Ono had a son, Sean, and in 1980 the couple released their album Double Fantasy, which topped the charts and included the No. 1 single "(Just Like) Starting Over."

December 9, 1965
A Charlie Brown Christmas is the first of many
prime-time animated TV specials based upon the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz aired for the first time.

A Charlie Brown Christmas

Abominable "Bommi" Snowman MySpace Video

It was produced and directed by former Warner Bros. and UPA animator Bill Meléndez, who also supplied the voice for the character of Snoopy. Initially sponsored by Coca-Cola, the special aired on CBS from its debut in 1965 through 2000, and has aired on ABC since 2001. For many years it aired only annually, but is now telecast at least twice during the Christmas season. The special has been honored with both an Emmy and Peabody award.
A Charlie Brown Christmas is also one of CBS's most successful specials, airing annually more times on that network than even MGM's classic motion picture The Wizard of Oz. Oz was shown thirty-one times on CBS, but not consecutively; between 1968 and 1976, NBC aired the 1939 film.

December 11, 1944
Teri Garr is born in Lakewood, Ohio.

Garr was born into a show business family: Her father was a vaudeville performer and her mother was a Rockette. After launching her own performing career as a dancer, she made her film debut with a tiny role in 1963’s A Swingin’ Affair. She went on to appear in a string of Elvis Presley films, including Fun in Acapulco (1963), Kissin’ Cousins (1964), Viva Las Vegas (1964) and Clambake (1967). In the early 1970s, Garr was a regular on such TV shows as The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour. Garr’s big-screen breakthrough came in 1974, when she was featured in writer-director Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, a psychological thriller starring Gene Hackman as a surveillance expert. The film received three Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture. That same year, the blonde actress played Dr. Frankenstein’s pretty lab assistant Inga in director Mel Brooks’ hit horror spoof Young Frankenstein, which co-starred Gene Wilder, Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Madeline Kahn and Cloris Leachman.
In 1977, Garr co-starred in director Carl Reiner’s Oh, God!, playing the skeptical wife of a supermarket manager (played by John Denver) who is picked by God (George Burns) to spread his message. In Steven Spielberg’s multiple Oscar-nominated hit Close Encounters of the Third Kind later that year, Garr played another disapproving mate, this time of a cable guy (Richard Dreyfuss) who displays increasingly strange and obsessive behavior after an encounter with a UFO. In 1979, Garr appeared in The Black Stallion, based on the classic children’s novel by Walter Farley.
In 1982, Garr co-starred in Tootsie, writer-director Sydney Pollack’s comedy about an out-of-work actor, played by Dustin Hoffman, who dresses in drag to land a role. The film was a huge box-office success and earned nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress for Garr’s portrayal of Sandy Lester, the neurotic actress friend of Hoffman’s character. Garr lost the Oscar to her Tootsie cast mate, Jessica Lange, who played a soap actress for whom Hoffman’s character falls.
Garr went on to appear in such films as Mr. Mom (1983), with Michael Keaton, After Hours (1985), Mom and Dad Save the World (1992) and Dumb & Dumber (1994). Known for her comedic talents, she’s hosted Saturday Night Live several times and has been a frequent guest on The Late Show with David Letterman. Garr also appeared on the hit sitcom Friends as the estranged biological mother of Phoebe Buffay, played by Lisa Kudrow.
In 2002, Garr publicly announced that she has been suffering from multiple sclerosis for a number of years. Since then, she has been a dedicated advocate for awareness of the disease. Garr published an autobiography, Speedbumps, in 2005.
To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

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Tony Figueroa