Monday, August 29, 2016

This Week in Television History: August 2016 PART V

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history,
the more that fact and legend become intertwined.
It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

August 29, 1966
Mia Farrow withdrew from the cast of the ABC-TV's Peyton Place.
Farrow left the series in 1966 at the urging of Frank Sinatra whom she married on July 19, 1966.

September 3, 1966
The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet airs its last episode. 

The sitcom focused on the comic antics of a young family based on the real-life family of show founders and stars Ozzie and Harriet Nelson. The show premiered as a radio comedy in 1944 and ran for 10 years. Even before the radio show ended, a TV version launched in 1952; the television show ran until 1966. The Nelson's two sons, Ricky and David, played themselves on the TV version.

September 3, 1991

It’s a Wonderful Life director Capra dies. 

On this day in 1991, Frank Capra, a leading Hollywood director in the 1930s and 1940s whose movies include the now-classic You Can’t Take It With You, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and It’s a Wonderful Life, dies at the age of 94 at his home in La Quinta, California. According to his obituary in the New York Times: “Capra movies were idealistic, sentimental and patriotic. His major films embodied his flair for improvisation and spontaneity, buoyant humor and sympathy for the populist beliefs of the 1930s.”

Capra was born in Sicily, on May 18, 1897, and as a young boy sailed to America in steerage with his family, who settled in Los Angeles. After graduating from the California Institute of Technology and serving in the U.S. Army, Capra worked his way up through the movie industry; he had his first big success as a director with 1933’s Lady for a Day, which received a Best Picture Academy Award nomination. The following year, Capra helmed the comedy It Happened One Night, starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert. The film took home Oscars in five categories: Best Director, Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Actor and Actress. Capra won a second Best Director Oscar for Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), which starred Gary Cooper as a man who inherits a large fortune and wants to use it to help Depression-era families. Capra received a third Best Director Oscar for You Can’t Take It With You (1938), a movie about an eccentric family that starred James Stewart, Jean Arthur and Lionel Barrymore and was based on the Pulitzer prize-winning play of the same name by Moss Hart and George Kaufman.
In 1940, Capra took home a fourth Best Director Oscar for Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), which featured Stewart as an incorruptible U.S. senator. 

After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Capra joined the Army again and during his time in the service made several well-received propaganda films, including Prelude to War (1943), which earned an Academy Award for Best Documentary. Capra went on to co-write and direct 1946’s It’s a Wonderful Life, perhaps his best-known work. The film again starred Stewart, this time as George Bailey, a small-town man who is saved from suicide by a guardian angel. Although the film was considered a box-office disappointment when it was first released, it garnered five Oscar nominations, including one for Best Picture, and eventually gained widespread appeal when it was broadcast annually on TV around Christmastime, starting in the 1970s.
Capra’s final film was Pocketful of Miracles (1961), a remake of Lady for a Day starring Bette Davis as a street vendor who needs to remake herself into a society dame in order not to disappoint her daughter.

September 4, 1966
The Jerry Lewis MDA Labor Day Telethon was an annual telethon held each Labor Day in the United States to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). The show was founded and hosted by actor and comedian Jerry Lewis, who hosted the broadcast from its 1966 inception until 2010.  The history of MDA's telethon dated back to the 1950s, when the Jerry Lewis Thanksgiving Party for MDA raised funds for the organization's New York City area operations. The telethon was held annually on Labor Day weekend beginning in 1966, and would raise $2.45 billion for MDA from its inception through 2009.
The telethon aired up to 21½ hours, starting on the Sunday evening preceding Labor Day and continuing until late Monday afternoon on the holiday itself. MDA called its network of participating stations the "Love Network". The show originated from Las Vegas for 28 of the years it was broadcast.
Beginning in 2011, coinciding with Lewis's controversial departure, MDA radically reformatted and shortened the telethon's format into that of a benefit concert, shortening the length of the special each successive year. The 2011 edition was seen exclusively on the Sunday evening before Labor Day for six hours; This edition, syndicated to approximately 160 television stations throughout the United States on September 4, 2011, Nigel LythgoeJann CarlAlison Sweeney and Nancy O'Dell were brought on as co-hosts. shared hosting duties for the 2011 edition.
Successive telethons from 2012 to 2014 renamed the show as the MDA Show of Strength and further cut its airtime. The 2012 edition aired on Sunday, September 2, 2012; the job of renaming the new show was given to MDA's advertising agency E.B. Lane (now LaneTerralever). Mark Itkowitz, their Exec. Creative Director came up with the name MDA Show of Strength and it quickly gained internal approval. The 2012 edition was reduced to three hours as a primetime-only broadcast. The telethon aired at 8 p.m. Eastern and Pacific Time, and was seen live in the Eastern and Central time zones.
The 2012 edition did not refer itself as a "telethon". The 2013 Show of Strength discontinued the long-standing format of being syndicated to individual stations of varying network affiliation and aired on a major national network instead of being syndicated to individual stations, airing on ABC on Sunday, September 1, 2013, and being reduced to two hours. While the 2012 edition did not refer itself as a "telethon", it referred itself as such for the 2013 edition.
The final edition, for 2014, aired on ABC on August 31, again as a two-hour special beginning at 9PM ET/PT. This was the final edition for the telethon, as it was announced on May 1, 2015 that the MDA would be discontinuing the annual event.

CLICK HERE for a list of Stations


To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Friday, August 26, 2016

Marvin Kaplan

"I recognize that I’m a very lopsided human being! 

I’m very committed to my craft: writing, acting, theater, and film. 

I have a good life, but I made it for myself. You gotta make it for yourself." 

Marvin Kaplan
Marvin Kaplan 
January 24, 1927 – August 25, 2016
Marvin Kaplan died yesterday in his sleep of natural causes. 
Marvin Kaplan, Beth Howland, Linda Lavin and Polly Holliday
Marvin Kaplan was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1927. He is probably best known for his recurring role on the sitcom Alice where he portrayed a phone lineman named Henry Beesmeyer who frequented Mel's diner. He was a part of the cast from 1977 to the series end in 1985. His first film role was as the court reporter in Adam's Rib(1949). 
Kaplan also served as AFTRA Los Angeles Local President for eight years and Performers’ Governor on the Television Academy. He is a member of the California Artists Radio Theatre, Motion Picture Academy, Theatre West, and Academy of New Musical Theatre.

Kaplan had a regular role in the radio sitcom and later television version of Meet Millie as Alfred Prinzmetal, an aspiring poet-composer. The program ran from 1951 to 1954 on radio and continued on television from 1952 to 1956. In addition, the actor was the voice of Choo-Choo on the 1960s cartoon series Top Cat and had a small role in the 1963 film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World playing a gas station attendant; in both roles he was featured alongside actor Arnold Stang (the voice of Top Cat). Among other roles, Kaplan co-starred in the 1965 Blake Edwards comedy The Great Race. In 1969, he appeared as Stanley on Petticoat Junction in the episode: "The Other Woman". He also made a brief appearance as a carpet cleaner in the 1976 film Freaky Friday.
In 1987, he reprised his role of Choo-Choo for Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cats. At the same time, he actively returned to voice-over acting, playing roles in shows such as Garfield and FriendsAaahh!!! Real Monsters,Johnny Bravo, and most recently, The Garfield Show in 2011.
Kaplan was the commercial spokesperson for the American cologne Eau de Love. In addition to his role on Alice, Kaplan also played Mr. Gordon on Becker alongside Ted Danson.
A dedicated theatre person, for many decades Kaplan was a member of Theatre West, the oldest continually-operating theatre company in Los Angeles. He performed in many plays there and elsewhere. He was also an accomplished playwright and screenwriter.
Kaplan created the Kaplan-Loring Foundation to assist individuals in show business and, in particular, comedians, songwriters, composers, lyricists, and book writers who develop new material for musical productions.
Established as a not-for-profit organization in 2008, the foundation may fund scholarships and pay for tuition and books at Brooklyn College in New York for a promising comedian, as selected by the college. In addition, funds may be used to establish the Richard Loring musical workshop for songwriters, composers, lyricists, and book writers to help them develop material for new musical productions.





Good Night  Mr. Kaplan

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Your Mental Sorbet: BATMAN: RETURN OF THE CAPED CRUSADERS Trailer


Here is another "Mental Sorbet"
that we could use to momentarily forget about those things that leave a bad taste in our mouths.
It’s back to the 1960s as Batman and Robin spring into action when Gotham City is threatened by a quartet of Batman’s most fiendish foes – Penguin, The Joker, Riddler and Catwoman. This time, the four Super-Villains have combined their wicked talents to hatch a plot so nefarious that the Dynamic Duo will need to go to outer space (and back) to foil their arch enemies and restore order in Gotham City. It’s a truly fantastic adventure that will pit good against evil, good against good, evil against evil … and feature two words that exponentially raise the stakes for both sides: Replicator Ray. Holy Multiplication Tables!"



Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

David Susskind, A Televised Life: Next on TVC

Stephen Battaglio, business editor for TV Guide, will join us on the next edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL, airing Oct. 29-Nov. 3 at the following times and stations:

WROM Radio
Detroit, MI
Wednesday 10/29
8pm ET, 5pm PT
2am ET, 11pm PT
Sunday 11/2
8pm ET, 5pm PT
2am ET, 11pm PT
Click on the Listen Live button at WROMRadio.net

Share-a-Vision Radio
San Francisco Bay Area
Friday 10/31
7pm ET, 4pm PT
10pm ET, 7pm PT
Click on the Listen Live button at KSAV.org
Use the TuneIn app on your smartphone and type in KSAV
or hear us on the KSAV channel on CX Radio Brazil

Indiana Talks
Marion, IN
Saturday 11/1
8pm ET, 5pm PT
Sunday 11/2
6pm ET, 3pm PT
Click on the player at IndianaTalks.com
or use the TuneIn app on your smartphone and type in Indiana Talks

Pittsburgh Talks
Pittsburgh, PA
Saturday 11/1
8pm ET, 5pm PT
Sunday 11/2
6pm ET, 3pm PT
Click on the player at PittTalks.com
or use the TuneIn app on your smartphone and type in Pittsburgh Talks

KSCO-AM 1080
San Jose, Santa Cruz and Salinas, CA
KOMY-AM 1340
La Selva Beach and Watsonville, CA
Sunday 11/2
11am ET, 8am PT
Also streaming at KSCO.com

Boost Radio Network
Paramus, NJ
Sunday 11/2
8pm ET, 5pm PT
Click on the On the Air button at BoostRadioNetwork.com

KHMB-AM 1710
Half Moon Bay, CA
Sunday 11/2
9pm PT
Monday 11/3
Midnight ET
Click on the Listen Live button at KHMBRadio.com
or use the Live365 app on your smartphone and type in KHMB

RadioSlot.com
San Francisco, CA
Monday 11/3
10pm ET, 7pm PT
with replays Tuesday thru Friday at 10pm ET, 7pm PT
Click on the Talk Slot button at RadioSlot.com

PWRNetwork
Ann Arbor, MI
Various times throughout the week
on the Entertainment Channel at PWRNetwork.com
David Susskind took risks, broke rules and, in many ways, shaped television programming as we currently know it today. After beginning his career as a publicist and agent, and establishing his own agency, Talent Associates, Susskind went from behind the desk to behind the scenes, establishing himself as a producer of such live television productions as Armstrong Circle Theatre, where he battled network practices of blacklisting, exposed TV audiences to provocative subject matter and introduced such actors as Sir Laurence Olivier to American television. But it was his groundbreaking weekly talk show, Open End, that made Susskind a household name. Open End ran for 25 years and featured movers and shakers could speak their minds about a wide range of topics literally without restrictions.

Joining us this week as we remember David Susskind will be Stephen Battaglio, business editor for TV Guide and the author of David Susskind: A Televised Life, an excellent biography of Susskind that not only covers every aspect of the life and career of the legendary producer, talk show host and impresario, but in many ways is also a capsule history of the first four decades of television.
TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Wed and Sun 8pm ET, 5pm PT on WROM Radio
Wed 9pm ET, 6pm PT on WYYR: Yesteryear Radio
Fri 7pm ET and PT on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org and CX Radio Brazil
Sat 8pm ET, 5pm PT and Sun 6pm ET, 3pm PT on Indiana Talks
Sat 8pm ET, 5pm PT and Sun 6pm ET, 3pm PT on Pittsburgh Talks
Sun 11am ET, 8am PT KSCO-AM 1080 (San Jose, Santa Cruz and Salinas, CA)
Sun 11am ET, 8am PT KOMY-AM 1340 (La Selva Beach and Watsonville, CA)
Sun 8pm ET, 5pm PT Boost Radio Network
Sun 9pm PT, Mon Mid ET on KHMB-AM 1710 (Half Moon Bay, CA)
Mon 10pm ET, 7pm PT on The Radio Slot Network
Replays various times throughout the week on the Entertainment Channel at PWRNetwork
Tape us now, listen to us later, using DAR.fm/tvconfidential
Also available as a podcast via iTunes, FeedBurner
and now on your mobile phone via Stitcher.com
Follow us online at www.tvconfidential.net
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Monday, August 22, 2016

This Week in Television History: August 2016 PART IV

As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history,
the more that fact and legend become intertwined.
It's hard to say where the truth really lies.

August 25, 1931
Regis Francis Xavier Philbin is born. 

Media personality and occasional actor, known for fronting various talk and game shows. Appearing on television since the late 1950s. Philbin holds the Guinness World Record for the most time spent in front of a television camera

His trademarks include his excited manner, his New York Bronx accent, his wit, and irreverent ad-libs. He is most widely known for Live with Regis and Kelly

Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, Million Dollar Password, and for hosting the first season of America's Got Talent. He is the cousin of singer-songwriter and American Idol judge Kara DioGuardi.
CLICK HERE for a list of Stations


To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Friday, August 19, 2016

Jack Riley

John A. "Jack" Riley Jr.
December 30, 1935 - August 19, 2016
Jack Riley, died of pneumonia and infection today in Los Angeles. He was 80. 
Riley became a popular radio personality in Cleveland, along with his radio partner and "straight man" Jeff Baxter; The Baxter and Riley Show on WERE (1300 AM) featured not only music but comedy sketches and a slew of offbeat characters which Riley and Baxter voiced.
The show expanded for a time to local television on WEWS.
Riley gave up the radio show in the mid 1960s and moved to Los Angeles, where his friend Tim Conway helped him receive work writing comedy sketches, which later led to acting opportunities.


On May 18, 1975, he married Ginger Lawrence. They have two children.Riley was first a semi-regular in the cast of the 1960s sitcom Occasional Wife, a short-lived show on NBC in which he played Wally Frick, although, and perhaps, his greatest fame came in the character of Elliot Carlin, the neurotic, sour and selfish patient on The Bob Newhart Show.

He soon became one of the busiest guest stars on television in the 1970s and '80s.
Among his other TV credits are multiple appearances on such shows as Barney MillerHogan's HeroesThe Mary Tyler Moore ShowOne Day at a Time,Gomer PyleDiff'rent Strokes and Night Court.
In 1973, he was cast as Gomez Addams in The Addams Family Fun-House, then in 1979, he starred in ABC's holiday telefilm The Halloween That Almost Wasn't (aka The Night Dracula Saved The World) as Warren the Werewolf (Wolf Man) of Budapest.
Riley appeared in a little-known HBO comedy special in 1980 called The Wild Wacky Wonderful World of Winter.
He was a regular cast member in The Tim Conway Show, a comedy-variety show that aired on CBS from March 1980 through the late Summer of 1981, acting in sketch comedy in each episode.
Riley was also a favorite of Mel Brooks, appearing in several of his films: High AnxietyHistory of the World: Part ITo Be or Not to Be, and (cameo only) Spaceballs.
In 1985, he reprised his Bob Newhart Show role of Elliot Carlin on St. Elsewhere.
Riley has also been a ubiquitous voice in television and radio commercials, most notably in spots for Country Crock margarine. He also voiced the character "P.C. Modem, the computer genius" in radio commercials for CompUSA which aired in the 1990s, and the character Stu Pickles in Rugrats and All Grown Up!.
He continued to make guest appearances during the 1990s in popular sitcoms, showing up in episodes of SeinfeldSon of the BeachFriendsCoachThe Drew Carey ShowThat '70s Show and, in a gag appearance, as an unnamed but obvious Mr. Carlin in an episode of Newhart.
He made a cameo appearance on the November 23, 2013, episode of Saturday Night Live, as a subway passenger during the skit "Matchbox 3". One camera angle lingered for an extra moment on Riley.


Good Night  Mr. Riley

Stay Tuned

Tony Figueroa

Your Mental Sorbet: Ralph Williams Bay Shore Chrysler-Plymouth


Here is another "Mental Sorbet"
that we could use to momentarily forget about those things that leave a bad taste in our mouths.

WARNING: Some profanity on this clip.


Circa 1969
Ralph Williams Bayshore Chrysler-Plymouth - San Bruno.
This commercial aired on San Francisco television.
Chick Lambert (and his dog "Storm") did the commercials. Chick was apparently replaced by a younger man and was upset, so made his final commercial for the dealer. This is just as it was on late-night TV on his final ad.




Stay Tuned


Tony Figueroa

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

John McLaughlin

John McLaughlin
March 29, 1927 – August 16, 2016
After missing his first broadcast in 34 years, McLaughlin died on August 16, 2016 at his home in Washington D.C of prostate cancer.

McLaughlin was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the son of Eva Philomena (née Turcotte) and Augustus Hugh McLaughlin. He grew up in a Catholic family who were second-generation Irish Americans. At age 18, he entered Weston College in Weston, Massachusetts, which later became the theological seminary of Boston College, to prepare for the priesthood.
He entered the Jesuit order of the Catholic Church in 1947, was ordained as a priest in 1959, and went on to earn two master's degrees (philosophy and English literature) from Boston College. After his ordination, McLaughlin spent some years as a high school teacher at Fairfield College Preparatory School, a Jesuit prep school in Connecticut. He took time off from teaching to earn a Ph.D. (philosophy) from Columbia University. He wrote his thesis on the Anglo-Catholic poet Gerard Manley Hopkins. He then became a writer and later assistant editor for the Jesuit current affairs publication, America, in New York City. Disagreements with the editor of the magazine led to his departure in 1970 after which he moved back to Providence, Rhode Island.
From 1981 to 1989, McLaughlin was Washington editor and author of the monthly political column "From Washington Straight," for National Review.McLaughlin was originally a supporter of the Democratic Party and opposed the Vietnam War but then became a war supporter and changed his party affiliation to Republican. In 1970 he sought permission from the Jesuit order to run for a seat in the United States Senate, representing Rhode Island. They had given permission to fellow Jesuit Father Robert Drinan who ran successfully for the House of Representatives in Massachusetts. When they refused, McLaughlin ran anyway but lost to the incumbent four-term Senator John O. Pastore. Through a friendship with Pat Buchanan, McLaughlin then became a speechwriter for U.S. President Richard Nixon. In 1974, after the resignation of President Nixon, he was ordered by his Jesuit superiors to return to Boston. He soon thereafter left the Society of Jesus.
Leading up to the 2004 presidential election, McLaughlin—though a longtime Republican—announced that he would be voting for Democratic Party candidate John Kerry.

The McLaughlin Group premiered in 1982. The show features four political commentators, usually two conservatives and two liberals, with McLaughlin seated in the middle. The McLaughlin Group is most widely seen on PBS affiliates, and is taped at the studios of WUSA-TV in Washington, D.C. 

The show is seen in the United Kingdom and other parts of Europe and worldwide on American Forces Network and Worldnet and is available in high-resolution at the The McLaughlin Group YouTube channel, low-resolution video podcast form on the show's website and on iTunes.

His loud and forceful style of presentation has been parodied by comedians and other commentators, most notably Dana Carvey of Saturday Night Live. McLaughlin himself appeared as the Grim Reaper in an SNL sketch that parodied his show.


McLaughlin also hosted the interview show John McLaughlin's One on One, first telecast in 1984, and ended in 2013. Also from 1989 through 1994, he produced and hosted McLaughlin, a one-hour nightly talk show on CNBC. For a short while in 1999, he hosted an MSNBC show, McLaughlin Special Report. The show was announced on January 22, and its cancellation was announced on February 25.

Good Night Dr. McLaughlin 
Stay Tuned 
Tony Figueroa 

Monday, August 15, 2016

Single Season Sitcoms, plus a Comic Look at Corruption: Next on TVC

Television writer/producer David Misch, TV and music historian Bob Leszczak and Hollywood Museum founder and president Donelle Dadigan will join us on the next edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL, airing Aug. 19-22 at the following times and venues:

Share-a-Vision Radio
San Francisco Bay Area
Friday 8/19
7pm ET, 4pm PT
10pm ET, 7pm PT
Click on the Listen Live button at KSAV.org
Use the TuneIn app on your smartphone and type in KSAV
Hear us on the KSAV channel on CX Radio Brazil
Hear us on your cell phone or landline number by dialing 712-432-4235

Indiana Talks
Marion, IN
Saturday 8/20
8pm ET, 5pm PT
Sunday 8/21
6pm ET, 3pm PT
Click on the player at IndianaTalks.com
or use the TuneIn app on your smartphone and type in Indiana Talks

KSCO-AM 1080
San Jose, Santa Cruz and Salinas, CA
KOMY-AM 1340
La Selva Beach and Watsonville, CA
Sunday 8/21
9am ET, 6am PT
Also streaming at KSCO.com

KHMB AM-1710
KHMV-LP 100.9 FM

Half Moon Bay, CA
Sunday 8/21
9pm PT
Monday 8/22
Midnight ET
Click on the Listen Live button at KHMBRadio.com

RadioSlot.com
San Francisco, CA
Monday 8/22
10pm ET, 7pm PT
with replays Tuesday thru Friday at 10pm ET, 7pm PT
Click on the Talk Slot button at RadioSlot.com

PWRNetwork
Ann Arbor, MI
Various times throughout the week
on the Entertainment Channel at PWRNetwork.com
and the PWR channel on TuneIn

Television writer/producer David Misch will join us in our first hour. David has also written for and/or produced shows for every major broadcast and cable network, including Police Squad!, Saturday Night Live, Late Night with David Letterman, and Duckman, plus he began his career in television as a story editor on Mork and Mindy.

David is also the author of FUNNY: THE BOOK: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Comedy, an entertaining look at the art of comedy from every conceivable angle. His latest book, A Beginner’s Guide to Corruption, is a satirical look at politics, finance and romance that shows how corruption can lead to wealth and happiness (except when it doesn’t work).

Music and TV historian Bob Leszczak join us in our second hour. Bob’s latest book, Single Season Sitcoms of the 1980s: A Complete Guide, takes a close look more than 200 shows that aired on network and cable television between 1980 and 1989 ― most of which aired for one season or less, though some aired over the course of a 12-month period (but not much longer than that). Many shows from this era starred such household names as Lucille Ball, Mary Tyler Moore, George C. Scott and Dabney Coleman, while others served as springboards for such future stars such as Jim Carrey, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Bryan Cranston, Sarah Jessica Parker, Geena Davis, Bill Maher, Matthew Perry and Chris Elliott.



This week’s program will also include a return appearance by Donelle Dadigan, founder and president of both The Hollywood Museum, one of the most popular tourist attractions in Hollywood, and The Jose Iturbi Foundation, which is dedicated to sharing and popularizing the wonders of classical arts and classical music around the music. Jose Iturbi was not only the first classical artist to have a Gold Record (which he did twice throughout his career), he also helped popularize classical music to mainstream audiences by appearing in seven movies for M-G-M during the Golden Age of Hollywood and by accompanying such popular recording artists as Frank Sinatra. Donelle Dadigan is also Iturbi’s goddaughter; we’ll ask her about Iturbi when she joins us in our first hour.

If you’re planning a trip to L.A. later this year, make sure you stop by the Hollywood Museum, 1660 N. Highland Ave at Hollywood Blvd., in Hollywood. Their newest exhibit, Child Stars: Then and Now, will feature items on display from the Golden Age of Hollywood and the Golden Age of Television, including Judy Garland's ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz, Margaret O'Brien’s Oscar for Meet Me In St Louis, Roddy McDowall’s costume from Lassie, the dress that Rose Marie wore when she was "Baby" Rose Marie (as well as the bow she wore as Sally Rogers on The Dick Van Dyke Show), items from Family AffairLeave It to Beaver and more. The Child Stars Then and Now exhibit will be open to the public beginning Friday, Aug. 19 through the end of the Christmas holidays. For tickets and more information, call (323) 467-7776 or go to TheHollywoodMuseum.com.

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Fri 7pm ET and PT on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org and CX Radio Brazil
Sat 8pm ET, 5pm PT and Sun 6pm ET, 3pm PT on Indiana Talks
Sun 9am ET, 6am PT KSCO-AM 1080 (San Jose, Santa Cruz and Salinas, CA)
Sun 9am ET, 6am PT KOMY-AM 1340 (La Selva Beach and Watsonville, CA)
Sun 9pm PT, Mon Mid ET on KHMB-AM and FM (Half Moon Bay, CA)
Mon 10pm ET, 7pm PT on The Radio Slot Network
Replays various times throughout the week on the Entertainment Channel at PWRNetwork
Tape us now, listen to us later, using DAR.fm/tvconfidential
Also available as a podcast via iTunes, FeedBurner
and now on your mobile phone via Stitcher.com
Follow us online at www.tvconfidential.net
Follow us now on Twitter: Twitter.com/tvconfidential
Like our Fan Page at www.facebook.com/tvconfidential

If you listen to TV CONFIDENTIAL, and like what you’ve heard, please consider supporting our efforts by becoming a patron of our show through Patreon. For as little as a dollar a month, you will help offset the costs of production and receive some cool rewards. For more information, please visit www.Patreon.com/tvconfidential... and thanks!