Monday, July 27, 2015

This Week in Television History: July 2015 PART IV

Listen to me on TV CONFIDENTIAL:


As always, the further we go back in Hollywood history, the more that fact and legend become intertwined. It's hard to say where the truth really lies.
July 27, 1940
Bugs Bunny first appears on the silver screen in A Wild Hare
The wisecracking rabbit had evolved through several earlier short films. As in many future installments of Bugs Bunny cartoons, A Wild Hare featured Bugs as the would-be dinner for frustrated hunter Elmer Fudd.
Bugs Bunny is an animated cartoon character, created by the staff of Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) and voiced originally by the "Man of a Thousand Voices," Mel Blanc. Bugs is best known for his starring roles in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated short films, produced by Warner Bros. during the golden age of American animation. His popularity during this era led to his becoming an American cultural icon, as well as a corporatemascot of Warner Bros. Entertainment.
Bugs is an anthropomorphic gray hare or rabbit who is famous for his flippant, insouciant personality, a pronounced New York accent, his portrayal as a trickster, and his catch phrase "Eh... What's up, doc?", usually said while chewing a carrot. Though the Warner Bros. animation studio first began experimenting with a rabbit character during the late 1930s, the definitive character of Bugs Bunny is widely considered to have made his debut in director Tex Avery's Oscar-nominated filmA Wild Hare (1940).
Since his debut, Bugs has appeared in various short films, feature films, compilations, TV series, music records, comic books, video games, award shows, amusement park rides and commercials. He has also appeared in more films than any other cartoon character,[4] is the ninth most-portrayed film personality in the world, and has his own star on theHollywood Walk of Fame.

July 28, 2000
Kathie Lee Gifford made her final appearance as co-host of the ABC talk show Live with Regis and Kathie Lee



To quote the Bicentennial Minute, "And that's the way it was".

 



 

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Tony Figueroa
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